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PENCIL 2 PIXELS
ARIJIT BHATTACHARYYA
CEO
VIRTUAL INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS
All drawings and text within this book are the property of their respective copyholders and should not be reproduced
DEDICATED TO MY GRAND PA.


DRAWING-BASIC SHAPES

It’s a simple loop but if you cannot draw a round then………..

Please don’t start out with that old theoretical talk, “I couldn’t draw a straight line.”  If we need a straight line, we can use a ruler.
HELLO DEAR!
Who am I? Oh, just one of Arijit Bhattacharyya’s little funny character. I’m the spirit of the book. I represent all the blue in here. He just calls me "Chankey’’ and lets it go at that. Now, I’ve got a few interesting things to tell you.
Since Arijit cannot talk to you personally, he put me in here so we can really get together. Now this plan of action is based on the use of simple forms that are already known and familiar to you, and which you can certainly draw. From these simple, known forms, we build other forms, which without some constructive plan would be too complicated to draw. For instance, the top of the head, or cranium, is nearer to a ball in shape than anything else. We thus "arrive’’ at the outlines that are needed instead of guessing at them. Only the most talented end experienced artist can draw at once the final outlines. That procedure is most difficult, and is the reason most people give up drawing. But knowing how to "construct’’ makes drawing simple and easy, and a delightful pastime to anybody. By building preliminary shapes and developing the outlines on them, we know WHERE TO DRAW OUR REAL LINES. There is hardly anything that cannot first be constructed by the use of simple forms.
 The simplest Forms we know are the sphere, the cube, and oval.
I say, “Draw a line.’’ You cannot know just what I mean. A straight line? A curved line? A jagged line? A wiggly line? There are a thousand kinds of lines; be more specific. But if I say draw a ball, a cube, an egg, a cylinder, a pyramid, a cone, a rectangular block, in each case the image you get is perfect. You know exactly what I mean. Instead of “line,’’ we shall think in terms of concrete and tangible “form,’’ and proceed as if we were handling lumps of clay. You can appreciate the value of such a method, for you know the fundamentals even before you start; they are obvious to anybody. If you never saw a ball, you should quit right now. As you proceed to build all sorts of shapes out of simpler ones, it is amazing what you can do with them, and how accurate and "solid’’ the resulting drawings will appear. The surprising part is that, when the construction lines are erased, very few could guess how it had been done. Your drawing appears us complicated and difficult to the other fellow as mine might seem to you now.
A circle is a flat disk. If you draw the “inside” contours, it becomes a solid ball, with a third dimension. We shall build other forms, like lumps of clay, onto this solidity. The construction will be erased, but the solid appearance will remain, giving form or the appearance of reality.
The simplest Forms we know are the sphere, the cube, and oval.
I say, “Draw a line.’’ You cannot know just what I mean. A straight line? A curved line? A jagged line? A wiggly line? There are a thousand kinds of lines; be more specific. But it I say draw a ball, a cube, an egg, a cylinder, a pyramid, a cone, a rectangular block, in each case the image you get is perfect. You know exactly what I mean. Instead of “line,’’ we shall think in terms of concrete and tangible “form,’’ and proceed as if we were handling lumps of clay. You can appreciate the value of such a method, for you know the fundamentals even before you start; they are obvious to anybody. If you never saw a ball, you should quit right now. As you proceed to build all sorts of shapes out of simpler ones, it is amazing what you can do with them, and how accurate and "solid’’ the resulting drawings will appear. The surprising part is that, when the construction lines are erased, very few could guess how it had been done. Your drawing appears us complicated and difficult to the other fellow as mine might seem to you now.
A circle is a flat disk. If you draw the “inside” contours, it becomes a solid ball, with a third dimension. We shall build other forms, like lumps of clay, onto this solidity. The construction will be erased, but the solid appearance will remain, giving form or the appearance of reality.



Get a pencil and paper quickly! Draw lightly all you see printed in blue. Take one stage at a time, on one drawing, until the last stage; then finish, with strong lines over the light ones, the lines we have printed in black. That is all there is to learn! These are "selected’’ or "built in’’ from the basic forms. I call the basic drawings “Blocs,’’ after myself.
I promised you that all you need to know, to start this book, is how to draw a lopsided ball. Whatever shape you draw can be used as a foundation for a funny face. Do the best you can, even if the ball looks more like a potato.

THE FUN STARTS!
The big idea is to start with a “form.” Then develop other “forms” on it. Build your final lines in by selecting, eliminating the lines you do not use. I leave mine in to show how it’s done.
Now, if the first drawings you do are not the last word in cleverness, don’t be discouraged. You will soon get the idea. When you begin to sense form, you will have the whole works. Then we’ll polish up, and they will have to admit you are good.
You need some practice on these. Never mind if they are a little off.
The better you can draw these balls in any old position you wish, the better you are going to be. The line from the top to bottom is the “middle” line of the face. The horizontal line, which looks like the equator, is the “eye line,” and it also locates the ear.

Look at the diagram. This last line goes completely around the ball, thought the axis at each end, and cuts the eye line just halfway round on each side of the middle line. The ear joins the head at the point of intersection of the eye line and the ear line.
Always construct the head from the cranium down. There is no other satisfactory way. You can see by now that the position of the ball determines the pose of the head. The pieces you build on determine the character.
TRICK STUFF
Draw a circle. Attach two smaller circles, not far apart, any­where. You can put a third above and between them. Then draw the middle line so it passes between the two small circles. Proceed as usual.
Draw three balls, one of them small, in any position. Connect the larger balls. Draw a middle line under the small ball. This suggests a head. Now use your imagination to complete the drawing.



Comic Figure

You know, I’ve a hunch you have been itching to get into this portion of the book. Well, it is really going to be great fun to create little people of your own, doing anything you want them to. There is nothing hidebound in this plan either. Take it in easy doses for the fun that’s in it. When the little youngster starts to draw, he instinctively does a better job than he does later on. He goes to essentials, a crude representation of the bulk without the detail. Soon he forgets the body and starts drawing buttons and clothes with a face on them. Result: he gets discouraged and transfers his attention to some pretty blond curls or a new bicycle. In all seriousness, I say that Nos. 1 and 2 of the marginal drawings have great possibilities; 3 and 4 still have hope. But 5 verges on those awful drawings in public places. Now we start with something very much like 1 and 2.
All we need do is add some sort of box for a pelvis, some pads for hands and feet, some balls at the joints, and a straight line across for shoulders.
We thus give him the following characteristics.
Head is a ball.
Chest is a ball.
Pelvis is a box slanted out at back and in at the sides.
The spine does not go through the chest ball but around the back of it. The legs are not straight but curve in to the knees and out toward the foot.
Forearm is slightly curved.
Chest ball is divided by a line through the middle and flaring lines at the bottom, like a Y upside down.
The reason for the curve on the bones is that they thus become “springy” and shock absorbing.
Without those curves we would be nervous wrecks before we were in short pants or panties as the case may be.
Every limb is movable in practically all directions. The chest ball is fixed to the spine but the spine bends in all directions. It can also twist or turn, so that there is a wide range of movements possible between spine and pelvis. Below we show a variety of comic exaggerations.

how to score high marks in your CBSE board examination.

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1. Make a time table and apply it in your daily life. In your time schedule give some extra time to hard subjects.

2. You have to practice frequently. Note down all the important formulas in paper and hand on it somewhere in your study room. Learn these regularly and also test in written on a paper.

3. Don’t read continuously instead take some breaks. I am not taking a long break like one or half hour, just go for 10 minute break in your studies. It will keep your mind fresh and you will find interest in studying. Hence you will learn the question easily.

4. If you are getting bore and feel sleepy leave that subject and switch to mathematics, you can try music on and do your sum . It happens in a case when you are not able to solve a particular question or not able to learn questions in spite of frequent attempts. Such question makes a student sleep or bore. Discuss the same question with your friends in class or coaching center, try to find out the solution with the help of your teacher or friend.

5. Written practice is must, take a watch in front of you and try to complete the answer within the time .

6. Leaning in the morning time is good. As well in the afternoon try put your mind into subjects like Life Science and Geography.

All the best for your exams. www.virtualinfocom.com

Based on my own experience , common challenges related to becoming self employed are:

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1. Money (need access to capital to fund your business)

2. Skill and Knowledge (It is important to be honest about
your own limitations and seek out expert advice and the
support of good mentors when needed.)

3. Feedback (to find other sources of feedback
beyond the latest sales figures)

4. Time (building a successful business requires
a large investment of your time)

some of the rewards of being an entrepreneur:


1.Money (your earning potential is only limited by your own brains and motivation)

2.Create opportunities (you can build opportunities and working conditions )

3.Sense of PRIDE (you have done something for the Country )

4.Time (freedom with your schedule)

Entrepreneurs yet to tap social networking fully

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Entrepreneurs yet to tap social networking fully’
Sukanto Mukherjee

    ‘TREAT your start-up as your own baby and nurture it’ – these were some of the insights shared by city-based entrepreneurs at a panel discussion on ‘Start Ups In Today’s Economy – Employment & Growth Factor’ at the Icfai Business School (IBS). The talk was part of Voyage 2010 — organised by IBS under the aegis of Entrepreneurship Week, India (February 6-13) initiative of National Entrepreneurship Network (NEN). Addressing an eager batch of B-school students and aspiring entrepreneurs were Arijit Bhattacharyya, CEO & founder of Virtual Infocom, and Prabuddha Sankar Raychaudhuri, CEO of SEOguru — both city-based it start-ups.
    Besides having a viable business plan and customised marketing strategies, both Mr Bhattacharyya and Mr Raychaudhuri stressed on the power of social networking as a business tool.

    “In an era when communication happens with a single mouse click, social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook are of immense help to start-up entrepreneurs, especially if they want to reach out to the global markets,” said Mr Bhattacharyya.
    On the other hand, ‘the potential of social networking is yet to be tapped fully by entrepreneurs in India’, felt Mr Raychaudhuri. But, as clich├ęd as it may sound, passion is of utmost importance when starting a business, felt both the entrepreneurs.
    “One should be prepared to make long-term sacrifices if he or she wants the business to take off, which is possible only if one has loads of passion and does not run after the money from day one,” Mr Raychaudhuri said.
    Adding an anecdote from his personal life, Mr Bhattacharyya said: “I dreamt of being a game developer when I was in school.” Considering that Infosys was started by NR Narayana Murthy and his friends with small capital but big dreams and that it took 13 years to reach where it is today, the role of passion for an entrepreneur has been underscored time and again.
    Both the speakers also highlighted the fact that recession is actually a good time to start a business. The downturn can be used to scale up, they remarked. “There is access to capital like skilled manpower at 50-60% lesser cost than in normal situations,” said Mr Raychaudhuri.
    At the same time, during the initial stages of a business, the entrepreneur must market the product himself, as he or she cannot afford to hire top-notch managers. Also, there should be sufficient bank balance for at least three-six months to take care of family needs, considering the risks involved, felt both the speakers.
    At the same time, ‘money is not the main constraint in an IT business’, said Mr Bhattacharyya. On the trend of Indian IT companies selling more services rather than their own products, Mr Raychaudhuri said: “Whereas a product takes at least $50,000 and 18-24 months to develop, a service can be enabled much faster and at cheaper rates. But, selling a service is much tougher, especially when one has to compete with global giants.”
    Hence, an IT entrepreneur must keep all marketing options open, he concluded.

Opportunities abound for startups in current market.

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Consider this: American legends Walt Disney and Bill Gates launched two of the country's most successful businesses to date during "down" economies, and 16 of the 30 blue-chip companies that comprise the Dow Jones Industrial Average were started during such times. So, even if the economy is at the bottom of a down cycle, is that so bad for startups?

Not necessarily. Forward thinking entrepreneurs are able to capitalize on uncertain economic landscapes, or even on "down" markets, for a handful of reasons. First, in an uncertain economy, individuals and businesses begin to migrate from those expensive, faceless brands dominating the upper stratospheres of the business world to those businesses--often startups--that are able to offer personalized service with upper management oversight at more cost effective rates. This paradigm shift begins to create additional new business opportunities
for startups, especially for those that possess an intimate understanding of a particular industry.

It is highly unfortunate when skilled workers, such as those from the former leading financial services firm Bear Steams, are left jobless due to economic conditions.
But, while this news rings poorly for the individual and the overall economy, these layoffs (typically from large corporations) mass to form a large pool of qualified workers now available to the startup business owner. Also, it is often during these times that former Big Business
executives may choose to parlay their years of corporate experience into their own entrepreneurial endeavors, flushing the market with new creativity and business ideas.

When companies face tighter budgetary constraints, they tend to outsource jobs and projects with more frequency, creating tremendous new business opportunities for startups.

One of the most important and costly expenditures for a business is real estate; so, when rapidly expanding businesses like Starbucks begin to scale back operations, or companies like Linens 'n Things go out of business completely, startups benefit. The influx of retail and office space to the market creates reduced rents and more valuable concessions from landlords who need to remain flexible in order to fill empty space. As vacancies rise, rental rates typically fall, and this is good news for startups that may have been priced out of some real estate markets.

According to The Index of Small Business Optimism, measured monthly by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), small businesses remained cautiously optimistic in early 2001 when economists were predicting a worsening economy. That's because savvy entrepreneurs knew then what they know now: there are opportunities in an uncertain economy to create the foundation for a largely successful business. And this is good news for the economy, too, which often relies on startup businesses for growth and jobs. In fact, according to The Small Business Administration, small businesses created more than 11 million jobs in the United States between 1992 and 1996.

So, while our economic outlook remains uncertain, I believe today's entrepreneurs should consider jumping into the marketplace. Companies like Hewlett Packard, founded in the midst of the Great Depression, have done exceptionally by remembering that economies, after all, are cyclical.

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